Pat's PicksPat's Picks are the stories we've picked from the Story Stack as our top recommendations for the day.

Pat’s Picks: Friday, February 21

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Friday, 21 February 2014 9:47 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

Letterman Trying to Land Leno

Letterman Trying to Land Leno

The New York Daily News says David Letterman is trying to book his now former rival, Jay Leno, to appear on “The Late Show.” Letterman wants a ratings boost as he tries to keep up with Jimmy Fallon on “The Tonight Show.” A source tells the Daily News, Leno and Letterman recently had a 20-minute chat to smooth over any hard feelings from when Leno inherited “The Tonight Show” from Johnny Carson.

 
Inane Questions for Olympic Athletes

Inane Questions for Olympic Athletes

Should you ever come across an Olympic curler - don’t ask if they’re good at sweeping the floor. The New York Times asks Olympians about some of the inane questions they face. Bobsled drivers would like you to know that they, in fact, are driving the sled and yes, they have seen Cool Runnings.

 
Under Armour CEO: It’s Not the Suit

Under Armour CEO: It’s Not the Suit

After a disappointing showing by U.S. speedskaters at the Winter Olympics, speculation grew that the new Under Armour suits they were wearing was to blame. But in USA Today, Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank says the suit was the scapegoat. He says he’s so confident in his company, he’s announcing plans to sponsor the U.S. speedskating team through 2022.

 
Amateur Sleuth Helps Reinvigorate 24-Year-Old Murder Case

Amateur Sleuth Helps Reinvigorate 24-Year-Old Murder Case

Every big murder case has a few amateur sleuths, but the St. Louis Post-Dispatch says Dave Sale is different. The rock musician’s obsession with a 1990 murder case has actually granted him with access to court documents, and his knowledge of the details has lent him an air of authority in the case. After he suggested a key piece of evidence was planted, a judge and an appeals court eventually agreed, tossing the evidence from the case.

 
Niche Dating Sites Offer Connections for All Kinds

Niche Dating Sites Offer Connections for All Kinds

If you’re a Trekkie, a farmer or maybe just someone who doesn’t tolerate gluten, there’s a dating site for you. The Kansas City Star says there are now hundreds of dating websites that narrow your field significantly. Reporter Rick Montgomery says niche dating sites can be practical, pointing out that a job like goat farming could be a deal breaker for many people, so why bother casting a wide net.

 
Frozen Characters a Huge Hit at Disney Parks

Frozen Characters a Huge Hit at Disney Parks

When characters from the movie Frozen were sent to Disneyland and Disney World, they were only supposed to stay long enough to promote the November 10th opening of the film. But they’ve since become such a huge attraction, Disney has extended their stays indefinitely. The Orange County Register says kids regularly wait 2 hours for a chance to meet Elsa, twice as long as the average wait for other princesses. One mother pointed out, the wait is longer than the movie.

 
Anchorman 2 Being Rereleased with New Jokes

Anchorman 2 Being Rereleased with New Jokes

If you’ve seen “Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues” you may want to see it again. The New York Times says the film is being rereleased with 763 new, raunchier jokes. Director Adam McKay says the editing process is so quick these days, he realized he could replace nearly all the jokes in the original film with bits that had been left behind in the editing process.

 

Pat’s Picks: Thursday, February 20

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Thursday, 20 February 2014 9:25 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

More Blood in the Brain May Reduce Concussions

More Blood in the Brain May Reduce Concussions

The Cincinnati Enquirer says researchers are looking into whether boosting the volume of blood in the brain may help avoid concussions. More blood means the brain more completely fills the skull, reducing the area the brain has to bounce around in the event of a blow to the head. Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital are testing a device to boost the amount of blood in the brain to what you’d find in someone who was been lying down for 8 hours.

 
Could Heated Runways Fix Winter Airport Delays?

Could Heated Runways Fix Winter Airport Delays?

After a miserable winter for air travelers, researchers are renewing efforts to figure out ways to economically heat runways or develop pavement that resists freezing. The Wall Street Journal says it’s an idea that’s been around since the 1970s. Airports can’t use salt because it corrodes the planes and snow clearing operations take too much time.

 
Facebook Acquires WhatsApp in Record-Breaking $19B Deal

Facebook Acquires WhatsApp in Record-Breaking $19B Deal

The San Jose Mercury News says Facebook’s $19 billion deal to acquire mobile-messaging service WhatsApp sets a record for Silicon Valley. The deal took just 10 days to complete. While the price tag seems astronomical, the Mercury News points out WhatsApp already has double the user base of Twitter.

 
Second Mortgages Making a Comeback

Second Mortgages Making a Comeback

The Los Angeles Times says homeowners are once again borrowing against their homes, despite the costly lessons of the housing market collapse. Bank of America saw its home equity business surge 75% nationwide last year compared with 2012. The difference this time around is applicants who are getting approved have high credit scores, ample savings and equity in their homes.

 
Home Monitoring Systems: Peace of Mind or Invasion of Privacy?

Home Monitoring Systems: Peace of Mind or Invasion of Privacy?

In the New York Times, Steven Kurutz examines several new devices that he says are aiming to glamorize home security. Canary and Piper offer an array of features, including video, audio, temperature and motion sensing - all accessible through your smart phone. One of the creators of Piper says it gives homeowners and apartment dwellers peace of mind. But one expert says the devices could undermine trust in family relationships.

 
Pharrell: Hit Maker, Hat Aficionado

Pharrell: Hit Maker, Hat Aficionado

USA Today has a profile of Pharrell Williams. He’s coming off a huge year with his hits like Blurred Lines and Get Lucky. His song Happy from Despicable Me 2 is up for an Oscar. USA Today calls him the music industry’s “most impressive multi-hyphenate: rapper, singer, songwriter, producer, drummer, fashion designer, philanthropist. And hat enthusiast.” He says he’s happy to be part of a movement of music that is pushing feel-good themes.

 

Pat’s Picks: Friday, February 14

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Friday, 14 February 2014 9:11 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

Are There Too Many Olympic Events?

Are There Too Many Olympic Events?

With the addition this year of team figure skating and a luge relay, New York Times columnist Christopher Clarey asks if we have too many sports in the Winter Olympics. He says it doesn’t appear the games are done growing either. Most of the new sports are different takes on old sports, like mixed biathlon, where you don’t need a new venue and you only need the approval of the International Olympic Committee’s board to gain acceptance.

 
Are New Suits to Blame for U.S. Speedskating Woes?

Are New Suits to Blame for U.S. Speedskating Woes?

With American speedskaters struggling in Sochi, the Wall Street Journal says team officials have identified a possible culprit: New, high-tech racing suits manufactured by Under Armour. Vents on the back of the suit designed to allow heat to escape are also allowing air in, creating drag. Under Armour says the suits were wind tunnel tested and designed by Lockheed Martin engineers.

 
Weather Wreaks Havoc on Valentine’s Deliveries

Weather Wreaks Havoc on Valentine’s Deliveries

Ladies, don’t be disappointed if you don’t get any flowers today. The massive snowstorm that slammed the East Coast has made a mess of the Valentine’s Day flower delivery schedule. Florists are having trouble making deliveries. And some distributors haven’t even been able to get flowers to the florists. The Washington Post suggests we call it Valentine’s Weekend.

 
The Keys to Lasting Love: Solving Conflicts and Genetic Luck

The Keys to Lasting Love: Solving Conflicts and Genetic Luck

Researchers at UC Berkeley say they’ve uncovered the keys to a long marriage. While it’s no surprise that couples who are better at resolving conflicts stay together, researchers also found that certain genetic markings may predict marital success. The San Francisco Chronicle says the study found that people with a certain gene variant experienced greater highs and lows in marriage than those without the variant.

 
Sports Anchor Stunned His Defense of Michael Sam Went Viral

Sports Anchor Stunned His Defense of Michael Sam Went Viral

The Dallas Morning News says local sports anchor Dale Hansen is surprised at all the attention he’s received since his on-air segment in support of Michael Sam, the University of Missouri player who came out as gay prior to the NFL draft. Hansen has been asked to appear on several national television shows. He’s received more than one thousand emails - and more than a dozen phone messages, and he says no one leaves those anymore. VIDEO

 
Insurance Company Testing Device That Monitors Location

Insurance Company Testing Device That Monitors Location

Progressive Insurance is testing a device that tracks a policy holder’s location. Drivers who stay close to home or avoid travel during the times of day when there are more accidents would be eligible for discounts. The company says it’s aware of privacy issues and it won’t share information unless ordered by a court.

 
Great Lakes Approaching Record for Ice Cover

Great Lakes Approaching Record for Ice Cover

The Detroit Free Press says the Great Lakes are 88% covered by ice. That’s close to the record of 95% set in 1979. The ice cover has some interesting effects, like eliminating lake-effect snow, making it sunnier in parts of Michigan and limiting evaporation. It could also delay the spring warm up which would keep certain crops dormant longer, helping farmers avoid a damaging spring frost.

 

Pat’s Picks: Thursday, February 13

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Thursday, 13 February 2014 7:36 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

Sochi: Winter Olympics or Summer?

Sochi: Winter Olympics or Summer?

The Winter Games in Sochi are becoming known for their balmy temperatures. The Wall Street Journal puts it in perspective with a chart comparing the temperatures in Sochi to the temperatures during recent Winter Olympics. While the outdoor events are held outside of Sochi at elevation where it’s colder, athletes have still complained about the conditions.

 
Liquor Store Owner Hopes to Become Ninja Warrior

Liquor Store Owner Hopes to Become Ninja Warrior

The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle has a profile of Carl Fantauzzo, a 40-year-old liquor store owner who hopes to become an American Ninja Warrior. After five seasons of the NBC competition show, no one has completed the entire course to earn the title. Fantauzzo has turned his home into a training center, with iron pipes to swing on, platforms to jump on and rock climbing holds over the basement staircase.

 
Success of Gun Buybacks Questioned

Success of Gun Buybacks Questioned

The Boston Globe says gun buybacks, a staple of urban crime fighting, may not be all that successful. Experts say there’s no evidence that they reduce crime. And they rarely net the guns most likely to be used in crimes. Some experts suggest the programs are mostly about public relations.

 
LED Bulbs Making Big Improvements

LED Bulbs Making Big Improvements

The New York Times’ Bob Tedeschi says LED bulbs have come a long way in a short time. Now that incandescent bulbs are no longer being made, LED bulbs are improving rapidly. Tedeschi says if you haven’t made the switch, your patience (or laziness) will be rewarded by bulbs that are cheaper and emit much more pleasing light than early LED offerings.

 
New Cleavage Trend on the Red Carpet

New Cleavage Trend on the Red Carpet

The New York Times says a new trend is emerging on the red carpet. Stars are opting for a more natural look when it comes to showing off their breasts. Instead of the traditional cleavage look, women are choosing plunging necklines that show off the sides of the breasts. Plastic surgeons say they’re noticing the trend too - as more women ask for a more natural, teardrop shape.

 
App Makes Your Writing Sound Like Hemingway

App Makes Your Writing Sound Like Hemingway

A new app is getting a lot of attention for promising to take your prose and give it the Ernest Hemingway treatment. San Francisco Chronicle business reporter Caleb Garling tried out Hemingway App. It’s designed to flag adverbs, unclear sentences and use of the passive voice. He says for those purposes, it will likely help writers. But Garling says part of the beauty of Hemingway is his tone and cadence. The app has a long way to go before being able to replicate those attributes. For the record, this entry got a score of 8 out of 10.

 

Pat’s Picks: Wednesday, February 12

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Wednesday, 12 February 2014 8:13 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

Why Do We Buy Bread and Milk Before a Snowstorm?

Why Do We Buy Bread and Milk Before a Snowstorm?

It’s a tradition that seems to go back generations. At the first hint of snow, we rush out to the grocery store. What do we buy? Bread and milk. Kelly Kazek of the Birmingham News explores several theories as to why these are our go-to items. One theory is that bread and milk are symbolic - as old as life itself. One psychologist suspects buying perishable items before a storm is our way of exhibiting control over an uncontrollable situation. VIDEO

 
Ryan Seacrest Launches Clothing Line

Ryan Seacrest Launches Clothing Line

I’m not sure how he finds time for all this, but the Wall Street Journal says Ryan Seacrest is launching his own clothing line. And while Seacrest is not the first celebrity to put his name on a clothing line, there is something unique about his. It features a color matching system to help guys match their shirts, ties and pants. Macy’s is rolling it out in 150 stores in time for the fall.

 
Virgin Passengers Get Their Own Social Network

Virgin Passengers Get Their Own Social Network

Virgin America is offering passengers a way to connect with each other “on the fly.” The San Francisco Chronicle says the airline is rolling out a dedicated LinkedIn Network that will allow passengers to interact with other passengers during the flight. Virgin already has introduced seat-to-seat texting and a “flirting” feature that allows you to send drinks to another passenger.

 
Vintage Plane Available for Rides

Vintage Plane Available for Rides

The 1929 Ford Tri Motor known as the Tin Goose was the first commercial passenger airliner, and the first plane to be made of metal. And if you’re in Miami, you can actually take a ride in it. The Miami Herald says the 15 minute flights will help pay for the plane’s upkeep. Rides cost $70 in advance and $75 at the gate.

 
The Personal Nature of a Chili Recipe

The Personal Nature of a Chili Recipe

New York Times dining columnist Jennifer Steinhauer explores the highly personal nature of the chili recipe. She calls chili tastes the political party of culinary offerings - “highly personal, often inflexible and loaded with preconceptions.” If you’re looking for a contest-winning chili, you’ll need to use beef. The CEO of the International Chili Society says they’ve never had a winner in 47 years of cook-offs that used any other meat.

 
Foods to Avoid for a Worry-Free Valentine’s Day Dinner

Foods to Avoid for a Worry-Free Valentine’s Day Dinner

If you’re hoping to have a nice, romantic Valentine’s Day dinner, the Las Vegas Review-Journal says there are plenty of menu items you’ll want to avoid. Steer clear of any finger foods, especially messy ones like ribs. Avoid spinach or any greens that can get stuck in your teeth. And don’t mess with seafood that requires you to crack a shell. Pass up anything that can make you bloated or gassy afterward.

 
Yuengling’s Ice Cream Returns

Yuengling’s Ice Cream Returns

Yuengling, the 185-year-old Pennsylvania brewery, is once again producing ice cream. The New York Daily News says the company began making ice cream during prohibition. It’s back after a 30-year absence. There aren’t any beer flavors, though the black and tan flavor is a nod to the company’s brewing heritage.

 

Pat’s Picks: Tuesday, February 11

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Tuesday, 11 February 2014 7:37 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

Why Do We Love British Accents?

Why Do We Love British Accents?

The Minneapolis Star-Tribune gets to the bottom of why Americans are enamored with British accents. Linguists say we associate that dialect with high status. Some experts believe it’s ingrained in our psyche from generations of being seen as inferior to the Brits. Even young children pick up on these cues, which is why even cartoons rely heavily on dialects to establish a character’s social status.

 
Wild Rumors a Part of Every Snow Forecast

Wild Rumors a Part of Every Snow Forecast

The Philadelphia Inquirer says the National Weather Service on Monday did something highly unusual: It predicted a snow total for a storm three days away. The agency says it wanted to counteract wild rumors swirling on social media of a 30-inch storm. Meteorologists say some weather-related Facebook pages use suspect computer models to drum up foreboding forecasts that nearly always prove to be wrong, but not before they’ve caused panic.

 
Family History of Heart Disease Trumps Fitness

Family History of Heart Disease Trumps Fitness

The Denver Post tells the story of Dean Schultz, an avid exerciser who almost ignored a twinge of chest pain. It turned out to be a clogged artery that, left untreated, would have killed him. Doctors say genetics trumps all our fitness efforts. Even if you don’t fit the profile of someone at risk for a heart attack, a family history of heart disease means you’re at risk.

 
The Most Common Sex Advice Question: How Can We Have More Sex?

The Most Common Sex Advice Question: How Can We Have More Sex?

Wall Street Journal relationship columnist Elizabeth Bernstein says the question she gets most often from male readers is some variation of “how can we have sex more often? ” She says the first step is to talk about it with your spouse. Then, try something new, such as a new restaurant, vacation spot or a hobby.

 
Old Men of Hockey Reunite in Sochi

Old Men of Hockey Reunite in Sochi

There are five players in their 40s taking the ice for the Olympic hockey tournament. The New York Times says these current and former NHL stars to some degree are surprised to still be playing at such a high level at their age. Sandis Ozolinsh of Latvia left the NHL in 2008. When asked if he looked forward to seeing players he used to play with he said, he doesn’t know any of them anymore.

 
7-foot-4 Dog Towers Over Owner

7-foot-4 Dog Towers Over Owner

The New York Post introduces us to Freddy, an 18-month-old, 7-foot-4 Great Dane who dwarfs his owner, 5-foot-4 Claire Stoneman. He’s still growing and is poised to become the world’s tallest dog. Stoneman says living with Freddy requires some compromises, such as early walks, because if he wants to run after a dog, she says she wouldn’t be able to stop him.

 

Pat’s Picks: Monday, February 10

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Monday, 10 February 2014 9:37 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

Doctor Designs Printer that Prints Human Cartilage

Doctor Designs Printer that Prints Human Cartilage

Dr. Darryl D’Lima and his colleagues say they’ve basically figured out how to “bioprint” living cartilage. The San Diego Union-Tribune says the bioprinter is adapted from an old Hewlett-Packard inkjet printer. It sprays out a mixture of cartilage cells and a liquid that congeals under ultraviolet light. The doctor’s aim is to put the technology to use in healing knee injuries.

 
Flappy Bird Grounded

Flappy Bird Grounded

Developer Dong Nguyen has kept his word - pulling the popular game Flappy Bird from the Apple App Store and Google Play. USA Today says Flappy Bird’s popularity peaked last week and on Saturday, Nguyen sent a tweet saying he planned to remove the game from the marketplaces. During an interview last week, Nguyen said he was making $50,000 a day from ads placed in the game. But other tweets from Nguyen suggested he may have been struggling with all the attention the game was receiving.

 
N.F.L. Prospect Comes Out Publicly as Gay

N.F.L. Prospect Comes Out Publicly as Gay

All-American defensive lineman Michael Sam from the University of Missouri spoke publicly about his sexual orientation in an interview with the New York Times - putting him on track to become the National Football League’s first openly gay player. He’s projected to be chosen in the early rounds of the N.F.L. draft in May. Sam says he chose to come out now, before the draft, because he sensed rumors were circulating.

 
U.S. Dominates New Olympic Sports

U.S. Dominates New Olympic Sports

Jamie Anderson is the big American story of the Olympics so far, helping the U.S. sweep the first-ever Olympic slopestyle snowboarding competition. The Washington Post says the U.S. dominates these new Olympic sports. Since snowboarding was introduced in 1998, the U.S. has won one-third of the medals awarded in snowboarding events.

 
Is “Dumb Starbucks” Really a Parody?

Is “Dumb Starbucks” Really a Parody?

A mock Starbucks in Los Angeles is a hit - drawing huge crowds for free dumb iced coffees and dumb iced lattes. The LA Times says it’s still unclear if the cafe aims to be a legitimate business or if it’s just a marketing ploy, art installation or even the work of a comedian.  Starbucks says it is aware of the parody and is looking into it.

 
Lego Movie a Huge Hit

Lego Movie a Huge Hit

I saw the Lego movie over the weekend - and it was a home run with me and my 9 and 12-year-old daughters who weren’t particularly interested in seeing it. The LA Times says the animated film took in nearly $70 million at the box office over the weekend. Warner Bros. executives say the strong opening all but guarantees a sequel.

 

Pat’s Picks: Friday, February 7

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Friday, 7 February 2014 8:21 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

The Musical Click-Bait Master

The Musical Click-Bait Master

Matt Farley writes up to 20 songs a day. He earned close to $24,000 last year selling songs online through iTunes and Spotify. The Boston Globe says he’s mastered the art of musical click bait by creating songs that are sneaky enough to show up in your search results, and catchy enough to convince you to buy them. A search For Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” may also lead you to Farley’s “I Want to Dance With Somebody, Anybody!”

 
Spy Cams in Sochi Showers

Spy Cams in Sochi Showers

Russia’s Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Kozak caused quite a stir when while trying to defend the conditions of the hotels in Sochi and complaints of a lack of water, he blurted out, “We have surveillance video from the hotels that shows people turn on the shower, direct the nozzle at the wall and then leave the room for the whole day.” The New York Daily News says the shower spying is reminiscent of an infamous scene from the movie “Porky’s.”

 
Jay Leno’s Final Tonight Show

Jay Leno’s Final Tonight Show

LA Times television critic Robert Lloyd says Jay Leno went gently out of that late night. For his final Tonight Show, Lloyd says it was mostly business as usual. Although he was not the most interesting of his peers, Lloyd says Leno’s mass appeal was not a sin, his pleasantness not a crime. Leno made many people happy, and no one’s happiness is less real than anyone else’s.

 
Not Your Father’s Ice-Fishing Shack

Not Your Father’s Ice-Fishing Shack

The ice-fishing shack is getting an upgrade. The Wall Street Journal says homemade ice-fishing shacks in the northern states are being replaced with custom-built houses filled with amenities including big screen televisions with satellite dishes, kitchens and bathrooms with heated showers. For fishing, they have underwater cameras and sonar systems.

 
Blogger Prompts Subway Bread Recipe Change

Blogger Prompts Subway Bread Recipe Change

The Charlotte Observer says the blogger whose post prompted Subway to change its bread recipe is looking for her next company to scrutinize. Vani Hari launched a petition on her blog, FoodBabe.com calling on the company to remove a chemical from its bread. Subway said the process of removing the chemical, azodicarbonamide, was already been in the works. Hari says it’s an example of what can happen if people speak up.

 
Photo of the Day: Olympic Luge Run

Photo of the Day: Olympic Luge Run

Our photo of the day comes from the Washington Post. Romania’s Valentin Cretu takes a run on the luge track at the Winter Games in Sochi. The Opening Ceremonies air today.

 

Pat’s Picks: Thursday, February 6

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Thursday, 6 February 2014 9:19 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

Opinion: Other Pharmacies Will Follow CVS’ Lead on Cigarettes

Opinion: Other Pharmacies Will Follow CVS’ Lead on Cigarettes

Chicago Tribune business columnist Phil Rosenthal says in the future, we’ll look back with disbelief on the idea that pharmacies used to sell cigarettes the same way we can’t believe smoking was once allowed on airplanes. He says as pharmacies position themselves as more a part of the health care system, they’ll have no choice but to stop selling tobacco.

 
Dow Chemical Helps U.S. Luge Team

Dow Chemical Helps U.S. Luge Team

The U.S. luge team may have a secret weapon in its quest for Olympic gold. Dow Chemical has created special sled runners that are lighter and easier to maneuver than typical sled runners. The Detroit News says it’s the first time Dow has undertaken such an effort for a sporting event. Using Dow runners, the U.S. team has already won four World Cup silver medals this season.

 
Will NBC’s Olympic Coverage Gloss Over Sochi Issues?

Will NBC’s Olympic Coverage Gloss Over Sochi Issues?

In the Washington Post, Paul Farhi wonders if NBC will objectively cover what he calls “the most troubled Olympic games in a long history of troubled Olympic games.” Construction issues, security fears and an open hostility to gay people are all among the issues plaguing these games. With the Olympics typically being feel-good events, Farhi says it will be a challenge for NBC to balance its coverage.

 
How Long Can Your Son & Daughter Share a Bedroom?

How Long Can Your Son & Daughter Share a Bedroom?

Living in the city often means brothers and sisters share a bedroom. But is there a point where it becomes too much? One professor tells the New York Times it’s never really been studied. Experts say most children wouldn’t think anything of sharing a room with a sibling of the opposite sex and it was quite common just a few generations ago.

 
Is Biggest Loser Now Too Thin?

Is Biggest Loser Now Too Thin?

This season’s Biggest Loser Rachel Frederickson’s dramatic weight loss has some people wondering whether she lost too much weight too quickly. Frederickson went from 260 pounds to 105, losing nearly 60% of her body weight. A former competitive swimmer, Frederickson says she rediscovered her athletic body.

 
We Need a Better “Selfie” Camera

We Need a Better “Selfie” Camera

Smartphone cameras have improved by leaps and bounds - but the front-facing camera on many phones is still lacking. The New York Times’ Molly Wood wonders why. The main problem is that we want our phones to be thin, and making a better front camera would require a thicker phone. Wood says a “selfie phone” would be a hit with millennials.

 
Craft Brewery Lets Fans Dream Up Beer Flavors

Craft Brewery Lets Fans Dream Up Beer Flavors

A Madison, Wisconsin-based brewery is billing itself as the world’s first completely crowdsourced brewery. MobCraft invites fans to submit their recipes or ideas on their website. Each month, the idea with the most page views, Facebook likes and Twitter mentions gets produced as the brewery’s featured beer.

 

Pat’s Picks: Wednesday, February 5

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Wednesday, 5 February 2014 7:58 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

If the Winter Olympics Were In New York

If the Winter Olympics Were In New York

While New York City tried and failed to land the 2012 Summer Games, the New York Times imagines what it would be like if the city hosted the Winter Games by superimposing various Olympic venues over different parts of Manhattan. The downhill ski slope, for example, would start at twice the height of the Empire State Building, covering two miles of Central Park.

 
How to Watch the Olympics Live

How to Watch the Olympics Live

NBC has finally decided to live stream all 98 Olympic events, so you won’t have to wait hours to watch the NBC broadcast. USA Today tech columnist Edward Baig says you’ll have to be a paid cable subscriber to watch most live events.  Baig says NBC’s free Live Extra app is getting a refresh in time for the Olympics.

 
New CEO Signals a Shift for Microsoft

New CEO Signals a Shift for Microsoft

Seattle Times technology columnist Brier Dudley says appointing Satya Nadella as the new CEO of Microsoft signals a shift for the company. He says Microsoft has a better chance of winning over developers by replacing its business-oriented boss with an engineer who worked his way up from the trenches. Nadella is an especially good choice, Dudley writes, because he stood out by working on “do-or-die projects” where Microsoft was the underdog.

 
Jeopardy! Champ Draws Criticism with Unorthodox Strategy

Jeopardy! Champ Draws Criticism with Unorthodox Strategy

The Cleveland Plain Dealer sat down with Jeopardy! champ Arthur Chu, who has racked up more than $100,000 so far in four days on the show. He’s raising some eyebrows for his unorthodox strategy, his glares at fellow contestants and the fact that he live tweets while the episodes air. Chu hops around the board searching for lucrative Daily Doubles - instead of starting with the easy questions and working down to the harder ones. He says he’s highly focused on the game and admits he wasn’t as personable as he could have been.

 
Praise for the Humble Sheet Pan

Praise for the Humble Sheet Pan

The most important kitchen item in your cooking arsenal? It might be the sheet pan. Or the half sheet pan, to be exact. New York Times Dining columnist Melissa Clark says the humble sheet pan is one of the most affordable, versatile items in the kitchen. It can be used to cook an entire meal at the same time. Clark offers her tips for putting the sheet pan to use.

 
Turn Girl Scout Cookies into Gourmet Desserts

Turn Girl Scout Cookies into Gourmet Desserts

The Arizona Republic has some top local chefs share their high-end dessert creations made from Girl Scout cookies. The recipes include Samosas Bread Pudding, Do-Si-Dos Apple Pie and a Girl Scout Cookie Roll from a local sushi restaurant.

 

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