The Perfect Scrambled Egg
Editor's Pick

The Perfect Scrambled Egg

Food author Michael Ruhlman shares his tips for the perfect scrambled egg.

Best Guess Ever on “Wheel of Fortune”
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Best Guess Ever on “Wheel of Fortune”

Pat Sajak says this was the most amazing solve in his 30+ years on “Wheel of Fortune.”

 

Pat’s Picks: Thursday, March 13

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Thursday, 13 March 2014 8:16 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

GM Knew of Ignition Problems in 2001
Source: Detroit Free Press
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GM Knew of Ignition Problems in 2001

Newly released documents from General Motors prove the automaker first learned of ignition switch problems back in 2001. The Detroit Free Press says it raises even more questions about why GM waited until 2014 to issue a recall. At least 12 people died in crashes related to the defect that prompted the recall.

 
Missing Jet Flew On for Hours
Source: Wall Street Journal
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Missing Jet Flew On for Hours

The Wall Street Journal says Investigators in the U.S. now believe the missing Malaysia Airlines flight flew on for hours after disappearing from radar. That means the plane could have flown for hundreds of miles from where its last position was recorded. U.S. counterterrorism officials are pursuing the possibility that someone may have diverted the plane after turning off the transponders.

 
Keep Your Smartphone Longer
Source: New York Times
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Keep Your Smartphone Longer

Keep your smartphone at least three years. That’s the advice of New York Times tech columnist Farhad Manjoo. He says you’ll save money and help the environment. Manjoo says increases in technology from year-to-year are often incremental so most people don’t need the latest and greatest phones.

 
High School Teachers Read “Mean” Tweets About Them
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High School Teachers Read “Mean” Tweets About Them

In a lesson about being careful what you post online, students at Los Alamitos High School in California persuaded teachers to read mildly mean tweets about them. That includes tweets about the out of shape running coach and the good-looking, but balding teacher. The Orange County Register says the video was inspired by Jimmy Kimmel’s segment where celebrities read mean tweets. It’s been viewed on YouTube more than 400,000 times. VIDEO

 
Attempting to Stand for 48 Hours Straight
Source: Minneapolis Star Tribune
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Attempting to Stand for 48 Hours Straight

With health experts warning about the dangers of sitting too much, Minneapolis Star Tribune health reporter Allie Shah set out to stand as much as possible for 48 hours straight. From being the only person standing in a meeting at work - to being regulated to the bus to ensure she stood during her commute, Shah found out just how difficult it is to avoid sitting.

 
Drywall Repair: A Step-By-Step Guide
Source: New York Times
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Drywall Repair: A Step-By-Step Guide

Thinking of fixing a hole in your drywall? You’ll want to read this first. The New York Times’ Bob Tedeschi has a step-by-step guide to patching drywall. After reading it - you’ll either be well-prepared to tackle those drywall repairs, or convinced it’s worth the money to pay a professional to take care of them.

 

Pat’s Picks: Wednesday, March 12

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Wednesday, 12 March 2014 8:29 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

World Wide Web Turns 25
Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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World Wide Web Turns 25

The Philadelphia Inquirer’s John Timpane marks the 25th birthday of the World Wide Web’s invention. He says the web is the most ambiguous invention in human history. He calls the web and the Internet on which it works, Shiva, the god of creation and the god of destruction. While it has made our lives infinitely easier, it has also destroyed or threatens to destroy countless businesses and industries.

 
New Starbucks App Could Boost Barista Tips
Source: Seattle Times
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New Starbucks App Could Boost Barista Tips

Starbucks is out with a new mobile app that allows you to tip from your smartphone. The company says right now 10 million customers use the app, accounting for 12 percent of all transactions. The Seattle Times says Starbucks has also added a “shake to pay” feature so that when a customer shakes their phone, a barcode pops up which the barista scans to complete the transaction.

 
Presidential Power Struggle
Source: Columbus Dispatch
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Presidential Power Struggle

The Columbus Dispatch says that for all the talk from Republicans of President Obama using too much executive power, there is actually plenty of precedent for his actions. From Harry Truman desegregating the military to Abraham Lincoln signing the Emancipation Proclamation, there have been many examples of U.S. Presidents making major changes through executive order. One Ohio State law professor says we’re on our 230th year of debating what “executive power” means.

 
FCC Tracks Rogue Radio Waves
Source: Wall Street Journal
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FCC Tracks Rogue Radio Waves

Could your doorbell or cordless phone prompt a visit from the FCC? The Wall Street Journal says the FCC is serious about tracking down sources of interference - which can be anything from florescent lights to aquarium heaters. The devices can interfere with cellphone towers, GPS signals or even AM radio broadcasts.

 
Comedian Under Fire for “Snake in a Cab” Gag
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Comedian Under Fire for “Snake in a Cab” Gag

Comedian Jimmy Failla, is in trouble for using a New York City cab for a YouTube hidden camera video called “Snakes in a Cab.” The New York Post says Failla picks up passengers, then pokes a live python at them, filming their horrified reactions. The Taxi and Limousine Commission says Failla exercised “monumentally poor judgement.” VIDEO

 
The Boss’s Cryptic Email Replies
Source: Wall Street Journal
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The Boss’s Cryptic Email Replies

Should you panic when your long, thoughtful email to your boss results in a one word reply? The Wall Street Journal says bosses often are too busy and get too many emails to put a lot of time into their responses. Others skip emails entirely because of poorly chosen subject lines. Some managers don’t respond to questions because they want workers to come up with their own solutions.

 

Preview: The Amazing Spider-Man 2

Preview: The Amazing Spider-Man 2
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And with this, I can reveal my involvement with the newest Spider-Man movie. The movie is out May 2.

 

Pat’s Picks: Tuesday, March 11

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Tuesday, 11 March 2014 7:27 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

One Man’s Snow Shoveling Total: 25 Tons
Source: Chicago Tribune
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One Man’s Snow Shoveling Total: 25 Tons

Chicago Tribune reporter Matthew Wallberg crunched the numbers to figure out just how much snow he’s shoveled from his driveway this winter. The result sounds impressive; 25 tons. Wallberg mapped the area of his driveway, calculated the weight by water content of the snow (after consulting with the National Weather Service) and multiplied the number by the amount of snow this winter in Chicago. He’ll have to adjust his calculations. More snow is in the forecast this week.

 
Is Bieber the World’s Biggest Jerk?
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Is Bieber the World’s Biggest Jerk?

Justin Bieber behaved like an arrogant, spoiled brat as he was being deposed by a lawyer in a suit brought by a photographer who says he was roughed up by Bieber’s bodyguards. The New York Post says Bieber rolled his eyes, sighed and mocked the attorney who was grilling him. The deposition video was leaked to TMZ. VIDEO

 
Too Much Sleep Could Indicate a Health Problem
Source: Washington Post
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Too Much Sleep Could Indicate a Health Problem

We all know sleep is good for us. But is it possible to sleep too much? The Washington Post says consistently sleeping 9 hours or more is associated with a higher risk of heart disease and obesity, as well as diabetes and depression. Doctors say it’s fine to sleep late if you need to catch up after a long night or week, but if it becomes a habit, you should get checked out.

 
Get Better at Saying “No”
Source: Wall Street Journal
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Get Better at Saying “No”

The Wall Street Journal has some advice for those of us who find it difficult to say “no” when others ask for help. Psychologists say we fear hurting others’ feelings by saying “no” but chances are they won’t be hurt as badly as we think they will. Rehearse saying “no” ahead of time and have a version of “I’ll think about it” handy.

 
Target Was an Easy Target
Source: Minneapolis Star Tribune
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Target Was an Easy Target

The cybersecurity firm McAfee has released a report saying the Target data breach was far from a highly sophisticated operation - and was instead a case of Breach 101. Hackers used off-the-shelf malware to infiltrate the system and did little to cover their tracks. The Minneapolis Star Tribune says the report points the finger squarely at Target for missing signs of a major security breach.

 
Barry Bonds Returns to Giants
Source: San Jose Mercury News
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Barry Bonds Returns to Giants

Barry Bonds returned to the San Francisco Giants, for a one-week stint as a spring training hitting instructor. The San Jose Mercury News says Bonds is so slim now, he needed a new pair of baseball pants and he was smiling more than anyone could remember. Baseball’s all-time home run king didn’t talk about steroids and wouldn’t say much about the Hall of Fame.

 

Pat’s Picks: Monday, March 10

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Monday, 10 March 2014 8:48 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

BPA-Free Plastics May Pose Greater Threat
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
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BPA-Free Plastics May Pose Greater Threat

The San Francisco Chronicle says parents are struggling with what to do in light of new research that finds BPA-Free products may pose a greater health hazard than those that include BPA. BPA has been banned in baby cups and bottles since 2012. New research has found the replacement chemicals may also disrupt the body’s hormones.

 
New Domain Extensions Mean Web Land Rush 2.0
Source: Denver Post
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New Domain Extensions Mean Web Land Rush 2.0

With more than 1300 new domain name extensions set to hit the internet, the Denver Post says the second great web “land rush” is approaching. New web domain strings such as .beer, .wtf, .club and hundreds of others are set to compete with the dominant .com. One copyright lawyer says the new extensions are akin to a real estate agent snapping their fingers and creating more land.

 
Missing Malaysian Jet Fuels “Live Black Box” Debate
Source: Wall Street Journal
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Missing Malaysian Jet Fuels “Live Black Box” Debate

The Wall Street Journal says no matter what happened to the Malaysia Airlines jet that disappeared over the weekend, the incident is likely to fuel arguments over better black box technology that gives investigators immediate clues in the event of a crash. Investigators have advocated for systems that transmit flight data in real time in the event of an emergency, but airlines have balked because of the cost.

 
Untethering Video and Advertisements
Source: USA Today
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Untethering Video and Advertisements

USA Today’s Michael Wolff says the deal between Disney and Dish that allows viewers to skip ads on ABC shows is a big step in ending advertising as we know it. Media companies have started adapting to a world without ads. But brands so far have been unable to find a medium which works better than television for advertising their products.

 
Canadian Regulators: Porn Channels Need More Canadian Content
Source: New York Times
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Canadian Regulators: Porn Channels Need More Canadian Content

The New York Times says three adult movie channels have drawn the attention of Canadian regulators, for not having the required 35 percent of Canadian programming. Canada’s content rules were put in place to make sure Canadian airwaves don’t get overwhelmed by cheaper content from the United States. But this appears to be the first time regulators have tried to make sure pornographic channels stick to the requirements.

 
Regulating Rabble-Rousers
Source: Seattle Times
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Regulating Rabble-Rousers

The Seattle Times has a feature on the people who regularly make it their business to speak at local government hearings. The question is how much is too much? While some cities have opted for private meetings within the boundaries of the law, others are going the opposite direction by installing software allowing citizens to comment from home during hearings.

 

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