Did This Man Invent the Selfie?
Editor's Pick

Did This Man Invent the Selfie?

Lester Wisbrod says he’s been taking photos of himself with celebrities for decades.

Pat’s Food Trivia Night at Bell House
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Pat’s Food Trivia Night at Bell House

Tickets are available for my food-themed trivia night at Bell House on July 29th.

 

Pat’s Picks: Thursday, June 12

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Thursday, 12 June 2014 8:40 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

Is the iPhone Headphone Jack Disappearing?
Source: New York Daily News
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Is the iPhone Headphone Jack Disappearing?

There’s a persistent rumor that Apple will eliminate the iPhone headphone jack, instead insisting that manufacturers go to Bluetooth or a headphone that plugs into the lightning charge port. The New York Daily News says that rumor has some Apple fans fuming, especially those who own headphones costing hundreds of dollars that would seemingly be incompatible with an iPhone 6. Removing a headphone jack would free up space for a bigger battery, more processing power or a better camera.

 
Clothes Dryers Wasting $4B a Year in Energy Costs
Source: USA Today
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Clothes Dryers Wasting $4B a Year in Energy Costs

While most of our appliances have become energy efficient in recent years, most clothing dryers have not. A new report finds Americans waste $4 billion annually in energy costs by using inefficient dryers. USA Today says electric dryers typically use as much energy as an efficient new refrigerator, clothes washer and dishwasher combined. Regulators have mostly ignored the dryer in requiring energy efficiency upgrades since the 1970s.

 
Why GOP Couldn’t Predict Cantor’s Loss
Source: New York Times
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Why GOP Couldn’t Predict Cantor’s Loss

Pollster Frank Luntz pens an Op-Ed in the New York Times explaining why no one predicted Rep. Eric Cantor’s stunning loss in the Republican primary. Cantor’s pollster predicted a 34-point lead 12 days before the election, yet Cantor lost by 11 points. Luntz says polls are only one part of the equation. Qualitative analysis, such as talking to voters to gauge their mood is just as important.

 
Bergdahl’s Journals Reveal a Fragile Man
Source: Washington Post
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Bergdahl’s Journals Reveal a Fragile Man

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s own writings reveal a portrait of a troubled man who struggled to maintain his mental stability - from the time he began basic training until the day he walked off his base in Afghanistan in 2009. Bergdahl’s close friend shared the contents of his journals, a laptop and other personal effects with the Washington Post because she said she’s concerned with how her friend is being portrayed.

 
What’s Wrong With Dinner at 5:30?
Source: Wall Street Journal
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What’s Wrong With Dinner at 5:30?

The Wall Street Journal says restaurants are pulling out all the stops to encourage diners to make 5:30 reservations, luring people in with sophisticated menus and online booking specials. Some say restaurants are more accommodating in the early evening. 5:30 seatings put restaurants at an advantage as well, helping the staff to essentially warm-up before being slammed by the 7 o’clock dinner rush.

 
Billionaire to Caddy For His Son at U.S. Open
Source: San Jose Mercury News
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Billionaire to Caddy For His Son at U.S. Open

I wonder if he’ll get a tip. Silicon Valley billionaire Scott McNealy is set to caddy for his son, an amateur golfer playing in this week’s U.S. Open. The San Jose Mercury News says the Sun Microsystems co-founder will lug his son Maverick’s clubs around the Pinehurst Resort & Country Club. Scott McNealy taught his son to play golf at an early age by having him aim for a lawn sprinkler in the backyard.

 

Pat’s Picks: Wednesday, June 11

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Wednesday, 11 June 2014 8:37 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

More Guys Embracing the Hug
Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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More Guys Embracing the Hug

Give me a hug. That’s the greeting preferred by more and more young guys, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. One researcher says the rise in male hugging can be directly tied to a decrease in homophobia. While more younger guys are embracing the embrace, the paper says it does trigger more awkward moments between millennials and older men who are more used to handshakes.

 
Cantor’s Loss Spells Trouble for Moderates
Source: New York Times
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Cantor’s Loss Spells Trouble for Moderates

The New York Times says House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s shocking loss to a Tea Party candidate in a Republican primary will likely pull the entire Republican party to the right and could doom any ambitious legislation, perhaps through the next Presidential election. The Times says Conservatives who have fueled showdowns on issues like immigration and raising the federal debt ceiling are likely to be emboldened by Cantor’s defeat. House leadership positions may now go to Republicans from solidly red states, not swing states like Speaker John Boehner’s Ohio and Cantor’s Virginia.

 
Opinion: California Teacher Tenure Ruling Won’t Produce Better Teachers
Source: LA Times
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Opinion: California Teacher Tenure Ruling Won’t Produce Better Teachers

A judge’s ruling that California’s contract with teachers violates the state’s constitutional guarantee to an equitable education is likely to set off teacher tenure battles across the nation. In the Los Angeles Times, education professor Jack Schneider writes that the judge’s ruling will do nothing to solve the problem of teacher inequality. Schneider argues that veteran teachers stall out not because they have tenure, but because they lack guidance and support.

 
Rio’s Economic Inequality on Full Display for World Cup
Source: USA Today
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Rio’s Economic Inequality on Full Display for World Cup

Visitors to Brazil for the World Cup won’t have to go far to see the economic inequality in Rio de Janeiro. USA Today’s Alan Gomez writes about visiting the biggest slum in Brazil. He says it’s separated from the high-priced hotels of São Conrado by only a four-lane road. I was there in April and saw first hand how sharp the contrast is between the haves and the have-nots in Rio.

 
Study: Kids Won’t Trust Those Who Lie By Omission
Source: LA Times
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Study: Kids Won’t Trust Those Who Lie By Omission

Think you’re safe by only telling your child half of the truth? Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found that kids are quite good at figuring out if they’re not getting the whole story - and will learn not to trust the information that person gives them. The Los Angeles Times says the lesson to adults is clear: Watch what you say to kids because they’re always evaluating you.

 
GE Designs Micro-Kitchen That Fits In A 6 Foot Counter
Source: Wall Street Journal
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GE Designs Micro-Kitchen That Fits In A 6 Foot Counter

With demand for so-called 450 square foot micro-apartments expected to rise, General Electric set out to build an entire kitchen that could fit inside a 6-foot long chest of drawers. The Wall Street Journal says GE was able to cram 8 appliances, including two ovens, a sink, a dishwasher and two cooling drawers into the space. GE plans to share the designs with the public, looking for suggestions on how to improve them.

 
How to Clean Up Your Online Reputation
Source: Washington Post
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How to Clean Up Your Online Reputation

The Washington Post says this time of year, companies that work to scrub your online reputation see a surge in business, as new graduates look for help before they enter the workforce. But the companies will tell you that none of what they do is all that complicated. One important tip: If there is something bad about you out there, stop searching for it, otherwise Google will think it’s important and will include it in more results.

 

Pat’s Picks: Tuesday, June 10

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Tuesday, 10 June 2014 9:03 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

Meet the Star of the World Cup: The Ball
Source: Washington Post
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Meet the Star of the World Cup: The Ball

The Washington Post dives into the physics behind the new soccer ball that will debut at the World Cup. The Adidas Brazuca ball takes the place of the Jabulani ball, which was introduced for the 2010 World Cup and was generally panned by the players for not having a true flight. Engineers believe they’ve fixed that by adding polyurethane nubs to the surface of the Brazuca.

 
Miss Indiana Ok With Being “Normal”
Source: Indianapolis Star
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Miss Indiana Ok With Being “Normal”

A curious thing happened during Sunday’s Miss USA pageant. Miss Indiana, Mekayla Diehl, stole the show and drew national attention for being a “normal” size. Although she wasn’t in the top 10, social media sites lit up with praise for Diehl for not being super skinny. Diehl says she’s ok with being “normal” since it’s better than “being weird.”

 
Is the Duck Dynasty Over?
Source: Orange County Register
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Is the Duck Dynasty Over?

Season 3 of Duck Dynasty was a massive ratings success. But by the most recent season 5, its ratings had plunged. Orange County Register television critic, Michael Hewitt says Duck Dynasty may be the latest show to enjoy brief moments of popularity before fading fast, including “Laugh In,” “Charlie’s Angels,” “Twin Peaks,” and “Deal or No Deal.”

 
Why Uber Might Be Worth $18 Billion - Or More
Source: New York Times
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Why Uber Might Be Worth $18 Billion - Or More

While many people were skeptical about the $18 billion valuation for the taxi-summoning app company, Uber, the New York Times’ Andrew Ross Sorkin says it’s worth doing the math to see if it might be right. Sorkin says the taxi industry is so huge, that if Uber were to control a quarter of it, the company’s valuation would be right on, perhaps even a little low. The company also has great margins, since it doesn’t own the vehicles, only the technology.

 
Which Type of Sunscreen is Best?
Source: Wall Street Journal
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Which Type of Sunscreen is Best?

When it comes to sunscreen, there are two different types: chemical and physical. The Wall Street Journal asks a dermatologist to weigh in on which type is best. Dr. Craig Burkhart says he prefers physical blockers because they tend to last longer, but they also can feel greasy. Burkhart says the best sunblock is whatever kind people will use.

 
Fresh Foods Key to Cutting Cancer Risk
Source: San Diego Union-Tribune
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Fresh Foods Key to Cutting Cancer Risk

A new report finds focusing more on a plant-based diet could be key to cutting your risk of cancer. Americans are being advised to avoid dairy, reduce alcohol consumption, lay off red meat and double their intake of fruits and vegetables. The San Diego Union-Tribune says researchers used a concept called the precautionary principle which holds that actions shouldn’t be undertaken if their consequences aren’t fully understood. In this case, it’s not certain that particular foods cause cancer, but the evidence that they might leads scientists to recommend avoiding them.

 

Drive Through All 48 Contiguous States in 113 Hours

Drive Through All 48 Contiguous States in 113 Hours
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Have you ever wanted to visit every state in the U.S.? Stephen Von Worley at Data Pointed mapped out the most efficient route for driving through the lower 48 states.

 

Pat’s Picks: Monday, June 9

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Monday, 9 June 2014 8:18 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

50 Years of Self-Service Gas
Source: Denver Post
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50 Years of Self-Service Gas

The Denver Post marks the 50th anniversary this week of the first self-service gas station in Westminster, Colorado. The owner of the station, John Roscoe, found he could draw customers to the new experience by charging 2 to 3 cents per gallon below what the full service stations charged. It took a decade for full service gas to really catch on - and even today, customers in Oregon and New Jersey are still banned from pumping their own gas.

 
5 Reasons the Stock Market is Glowing Again
Source: USA Today
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5 Reasons the Stock Market is Glowing Again

USA Today gives us five reasons the stock market is shining brightly. Among them: The momentum stock selloff didn’t extend to blue chips, the U.S. economy bounced back nicely after a rough winter and the U.S. and European central banks did their parts by keeping interest rates low.

 
Sgt. Bergdahl Refuses to Speak With Family
Source: Wall Street Journal
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Sgt. Bergdahl Refuses to Speak With Family

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has refused to speak with his family since being freed after five years in captivity, according to the Wall Street Journal. This as the debate surrounding his capture and release rages on. The Journal says doctors are moving slowly in light of the controversy, which is complicating an already difficult recovery process.

 
Research Gives New Hope to Peanut Allergy Sufferers
Source: Charlotte Observer
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Research Gives New Hope to Peanut Allergy Sufferers

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a fruit-infused peanut flour that could reduce deadly allergic reactions to peanuts and provide a safer ingredient for immunotherapy treatments for children. The Charlotte Observer says researchers have discovered that certain compounds make peanut flour more hypoallergenic by hiding or changing the allergy-causing proteins. One nonprofit says the number of children with peanut allergies has tripled between 1997 and 2008.

 
Brazil’s Unique Spin on Beach Volleyball
Source: New York Times
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Brazil’s Unique Spin on Beach Volleyball

As the World Cup arrives, the New York Times takes a look at Brazil’s other favorite sport, Futevolei. It’s a variation on beach volleyball, where players are not permitted to use their hands. The game started on the beaches of Copacabana in the 1960s. The most dramatic maneuver is the “shark attack” which is like a spike in traditional volleyball, except it’s done with the foot.

 

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