A Day in the Life of Pat Kiernan
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A Day in the Life of Pat Kiernan

Business Insider spent a day with me, documenting my 15-hour workday

The Perfect Scrambled Egg
Editor's Pick

The Perfect Scrambled Egg

Food author Michael Ruhlman shares his tips for the perfect scrambled egg.

 

Pat’s Picks: Tuesday, March 25

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Tuesday, 25 March 2014 8:17 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

Man Who Missed Chance to Ride Roller Coaster as 9-Year-Old May Get to Rebuild It
Source: LA Times
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Man Who Missed Chance to Ride Roller Coaster as 9-Year-Old May Get to Rebuild It

The Los Angeles Times has a fascinating story about Larry Osterhoudt, a man so obsessed with a roller coaster he never got to ride as a kid, that he may just get the chance to rebuild it. Osterhoudt has spent 17 years building an exact replica of the Cyclone Racer, a roller coaster that once stood on the Long Beach, California pier. Osterhoudt was too frightened to ride it as a 9-year-old and the coaster was torn down before he returned. But now the Long Beach City Council is working on a plan to have Osterhoudt rebuild the Cyclone Racer as a way to boost tourism.

 
Should You Hit Snooze?
Source: Wall Street Journal
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Should You Hit Snooze?

A long sleep debate gets awakened in the Wall Street Journal today. Is it better to wake up when the alarm goes off or to hit snooze and get 10 extra minutes of sleep? Dr. David Dinges says hitting snooze isn’t as bad as you might think. It allows us to gently awaken the mind. But he says it’s really just a temporary fix and the real solution is to get more sleep. Dinges says you’re better off going to bed 10 or 20 minutes earlier.

 
Smoking Harder to Quit for the Poor
Source: New York Times
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Smoking Harder to Quit for the Poor

The New York Times reports on a new analysis of smoking data that finds it’s increasingly becoming a habit of the poor. Smoking has seen huge declines in more affluent counties across the country, but smoking rates have remained the same in poorer counties. That gap in smoking rates among the rich and poor is contributing to inequality in health outcomes.

 
Mudslide Rescuers Try to Prevent Rogue Searchers
Source: Seattle Times
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Mudslide Rescuers Try to Prevent Rogue Searchers

Rescuers searching for the more than 100 people missing from Saturday’s mudslide in Washington are having a tough time preventing volunteers from conducting their own searches for victims. The fear is that untrained volunteers could become victims themselves in the continually shifting slide.

 
Couple Turns $10K Into $50M Rainbow Loom Empire
Source: Detroit Free Press
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Couple Turns $10K Into $50M Rainbow Loom Empire

The Detroit Free Press catches up with Cheong Choon Ng, the Michigan entrepreneur who saw his two girls weaving bracelets out of pony tail rubber bands and came up with the idea for the Rainbow Loom. Ng was able to convince his wife to use their $10,000 in savings to bring the idea to the market. It won Toy of the Year last year and the company saw $50 million in revenue.

 
Want a Bridge? How About Two?
Source: Kansas City Star
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Want a Bridge? How About Two?

Two bridges that span the Missouri River could be yours - for free - if you can move them. The Kansas City Star says the 2,600 foot bridges that carry U.S. 69 traffic over the river are scheduled to be replaced in 2015.  Since they’re eligible for the National Register of Historic Places, federal law requires the bridges be offered for reuse as an alternative to being demolished.

 

Pat’s Picks: Monday, March 24

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Monday, 24 March 2014 8:35 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

Gas Lines Another Aspect of Decaying Infrastructure
Source: New York Times
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Gas Lines Another Aspect of Decaying Infrastructure

The gas leak that led to the explosion in Harlem that killed eight people earlier this month is a surprisingly common phenomenon in New York and other big cities. The New York Times says nearly half of the natural gas lines in New York were installed before 1940. In 2012 alone, the two distributors of natural gas in New York City reported nearly 10,000 gas leaks - more than half of which were considered serious.

 
Bank Robbery Falling Out of Favor
Source: Press-Enterprise
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Bank Robbery Falling Out of Favor

It used to be the crime that sparked headlines and created famous criminals - but bank robbery has seen a big decline nationwide. The Press-Enterprise says there were at least 6,000 bank robberies every year between 1987 to 2006. By 2012, that number dropped to fewer than 3,900. Experts cite improvements in security, more cooperation among law enforcement and longer prison sentences. And many would-be bank robbers believe there are less risky ways to steal money.

 
Regaining Online Privacy
Source: Wall Street Journal
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Regaining Online Privacy

In this day and age of social networking, smart phones and other technology that gathers information about us - the Wall Street Journal says more and more Americans are fighting back to regain some online privacy. About half of all Americans say they’re concerned about online privacy.  Many are turning to even more technology to cover their tracks, using programs that show who has access to your social networking information and search engines that don’t track queries.

 
Liquid Nicotine for E-Cigarettes Poses Danger
Source: New York Times
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Liquid Nicotine for E-Cigarettes Poses Danger

Just a tiny amount of liquid nicotine can cause vomiting or seizures - and even a diluted amount can kill a small child. Yet, liquid nicotine is being sold legally, with no regulations, as the main ingredient in refillable “e-cigarettes.” The New York Times says reports of accidental poisonings are soaring. One poison control center director says many people seem unaware of the dangers posed by the liquids.

 
Archery Tournament Shows “Hunger Games Effect”
Source: Indianapolis Star
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Archery Tournament Shows “Hunger Games Effect”

The Indianapolis Star says the recent indoor youth archery tournament was the largest in state history. Nearly half of the 1600 participants were girls - up from fewer than 25 percent just a few years ago. The bow wielding heroines in “The Hunger Games” and Disney’s “Brave” are being cited as big factors in the increase in interest in archery among girls.

 
Metal-Detecting Helicopter Searches for Bombs
Source: Orlando Sentinel
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Metal-Detecting Helicopter Searches for Bombs

An unusual looking helicopter is helping the Navy clean up a bombing range in Florida’s Ocala National Forest. The chopper’s 20 foot-long arms are equipped with metal detectors that can scan the forest for exploded or unexploded bombs. The Orlando Sentinel says the contraption works in the same way as the guy on the beach with the metal detector combing for jewelry and coins.

 

Pat’s Picks: Friday, March 21

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Friday, 21 March 2014 8:35 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

FDA Slow to Approve Sunscreen Advances
Source: Washington Post
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FDA Slow to Approve Sunscreen Advances

You won’t find the best sunscreens in the world at your local drug store. In fact, you won’t find them at all in the United States. The Washington Post says the Food and Drug Administration hasn’t expanded its list of approved sunscreen ingredients since 1999. Eight applications for new ingredients are pending - some dating back to 2003.

 
Why Satellites Don’t Track Airplanes
Source: New York Times
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Why Satellites Don’t Track Airplanes

Airlines routinely use satellites to provide WiFi to passengers in-flight. But they don’t use satellites for the more routine task of tracking planes and gathering the information from flight data recorders. The New York Times says neither airlines nor regulators have adopted the use of satellites for these tasks given the cost and the general safety of air travel.

 
Twitter’s 8 Best Moments
Source: USA Today
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Twitter’s 8 Best Moments

Twitter turns 8 today. To celebrate, USA Today has come up with eight memorable moments in the microblogging site’s history. USA Today singled out user Janis Krum’s photo of a partially submerged US Airways Flight 1549 and the inadvertent tweet of the raid of Osama bin Laden’s compound as two of the more remarkable moments in Twitter history.

 
What’s Next for the Man Who Killed Pluto?
Source: LA Times
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What’s Next for the Man Who Killed Pluto?

Astronomer Mike Brown made a name for himself when he demoted Pluto in 2006. The LA Times catches up with him. Brown says “killing Pluto was awesome” but he’s now focused on a new task - figuring out how we got here. Brown is trying to put pieces of the planetary puzzle together to figure out how Earth was formed and how clouds of gas become planetary systems.

 
Computer Detects Fake Pain
Source: San Diego Union-Tribune
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Computer Detects Fake Pain

Researchers have developed a computer that’s much better than humans at determining when someone is faking pain. Using facial cues, the computer was able to detect whether pain was real or fake 85% of the time compared to just 55% accuracy of trained observers. The San Diego Union-Tribune says the program could be used to determine whether someone really needs painkillers or for children who can’t articulate pain well.

 
The Quest for the Perfect Playlist
Source: Wall Street Journal
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The Quest for the Perfect Playlist

Streaming music services like Pandora use complicated algorithms to determine our tastes to come up with playlists. But can a human do a better job? The Wall Street Journal says there’s a new job that essentially didn’t exist a few years ago - the professional music curator, experts who can help you navigate through the vast musical landscape.

 

VIDEO: Best Guess Ever on “Wheel of Fortune”

VIDEO: Best Guess Ever on “Wheel of Fortune”
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A “Wheel of Fortune” contestant solved the unsolvable last night. Pat and Vanna hardly believed that it had happened.

 

Pat’s Picks: Thursday, March 20

Written by Pat Papers | UPDATED: Thursday, 20 March 2014 7:22 AM

The best headlines, the most interesting photography and conversation-starting articles from today’s newspapers.

“Chicken from Hell” Dinosaur Discovered
Source: Washington Post
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“Chicken from Hell” Dinosaur Discovered

A newly classified dinosaur is being called “The Chicken from Hell.” The 11 foot long, 500 lb. dinosaur is officially part of a group called oviraptorosaurs. The Washington Post says fossils were found in a sedimentary rock layer known as the Hell Creek Formation in three locations in North and South Dakota - helping the dinosaur earn its nickname. But its appearance was definitely a factor as well.

 
Product Placement: Coming to a High School Theater Near You
Source: Wall Street Journal
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Product Placement: Coming to a High School Theater Near You

The next high school musical you see might feature something you don’t expect: product placement. The Wall Street Journal says school theater departments are co-opting a technique used in Hollywood for years. One high school production of Grease in Ohio featured a character carrying a pizza box from a local pizzeria that paid $500 as part of a sponsorship deal..

 
Rebuilding a $2.1 Billion Stealth Fighter
Source: LA Times
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Rebuilding a $2.1 Billion Stealth Fighter

The LA Times details the largely secret, four-year mission to rebuild a B-2 Stealth Bomber that was badly damaged in a fire in Guam. It involved hundreds of rare parts, thousands of man hours and 300 Northrop and Air Force workers, many of whom flew to Guam to work on the project seven days a week. With only 20 B-2s in existence, Air Force officials said there was no doubt they would invest the $105 million it took to repair the plane.

 
Alternative to the Colonoscopy
Source: Minneapolis Star Tribune
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Alternative to the Colonoscopy

Doctors at the Mayo Clinic have come up with an alternative to the colonoscopy that’s nearly as reliable in detecting cancers, but it’s not without its own “ick” factor. The test involves sending stool samples in the mail. The Minneapolis Star Tribune says the test could become an alternative for the millions of Americans who ignore their doctors’ advice because they’re squeamish about getting a rectal exam.

 
How to Deter Reckless Drivers: Punish All of Them
Source: New York Daily News
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How to Deter Reckless Drivers: Punish All of Them

Attorney Alan Dershowitz writes an opinion piece in the New York Daily News about reckless drivers. He says the only way to really deter reckless driving is to punish everyone who drives recklessly - not just those who kill someone. Dershowitz says, the law rarely punishes even those who do kill someone - with only five percent of the drivers involved in fatalities in New York being charged with serious crimes.

 
Oprah’s First Endorsement: Starbucks Chai Tea
Source: Seattle Times
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Oprah’s First Endorsement: Starbucks Chai Tea

For someone with as much influence as she has, it’s hard to believe Oprah Winfrey hasn’t endorsed a product until now. The Seattle Times says Oprah helped design Teavana Oprah Chai Tea. It will be available starting April 29th. For each Oprah chai product sold, Starbucks will make a donation to her youth education initiative.

 
Paradise for Pampered Pets
Source: New York Times
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Paradise for Pampered Pets

Anything you could ever imagine buying, and many things you couldn’t can be found at the Global Pet Expo. Penelope Green pays a visit there for The New York Times. There she discovers everything from anxiety-reducing shirts for dogs to the on-demand ball launcher for those dogs that can’t get enough of playing fetch.

 

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